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and president kennedy sent in the national guard to desegregate alabama university. a speech in which he formally called on congress to pass a civil rights bill. >> we are confronted primarily with a moral issue. it as old as the scriptures and as clear as the american constitution. the heart of the question is, whether all americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities. >> hours after that speech, after midnight, medger evers was shot and killed in his driveway a few steps from his front doosh. civil rights leaders rallied across the country and pressed for meaningful legislation and they determined a march on washington, something that civil right leader a. phillip randolph, had been talking about for years was the way to go. but the political class in washington felt differently. kennedy told civil rights leaders in a june 22nd meeting that a march could kill the civil rights bill he was now pushing for, saying, quote, we want success in congress. not just a big show at the capitol. some people are looking for an excuse to be against us. the organizers were undeterr
president on civil rights jack kennedy who somehow in the crisis of alabama and birmingham in june of '63 that same year came out with the most amazing commitment send civil rights is as ancient as the scriptures. the president is on our side. this guy here martin luther king was inspired by mahalia jackson, i'm going to give this magic. >> chris, you referenced the history, that on june 11th, vivian malone tried to enter the university of alabama, george wallace blocked her. and at jack kennedy's direction got her in and through the university of alabama. it was that night that medgar evers was killed. in the driveway of their home. after all the bomb threats and assassination threats against their family with their three children. hiding in a tub and running out and seeing their father slain in the driveway. there was a lot of violence. ron mott is in the crowd. ron you've been talking to a lot of people out there. >> a much smaller crowd than was on the mall over the weekend for the big march on saturday. i would estimate between 15,000 and 20,000 is the number i'm seeing. you can see
this was, how kennedys white house tried to get the andnizers to call it off, how the majority of americans had an unfavorable view of it. the peaceful protest seemed impossible to fathom. violence.d of it is universally acknowledged as one of the seminal events of the 20th century as they stood to demand those jobs and freedom. epic tome is considered the gold standard for that era. all this is coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. inc. you. thank you. >> joining us now to kick off these three nights of this historicon anniversary is the author of "the king years." fromr branch joins us washington. it is good to have you back on the program. >> i have been. talking and getting the message out. let me start with the obvious questions. how does the march on washington ?it into this narrative >> it comes in 1963, when the sees politicsly by the throat because of the demonstrations in birmingham earlier that spring culminating ofthe citizens -- sit in previous years. it led them to call for of march , so 63 was the year of the big rig through t
. we didn't have a particular bill in mind, but a strong bill. now, if-- president kennedy, in june of 1963, he didn't like the idea of a march. he said in effect, if you bring all these people to washington won't there be violence and chaos and disorder and we'll never get a civil rights bill through the congress. a. phillip randolph, he had been seeking a march back curing the days of roosevelt and truman. so he said in his baritone voice, "mr. president, this will be an orderly, peaceful, nonviolent protest. of we came out of meet with president kennedy, and said to the press we had a productive meeting with the president. and that day, i'll tell you, our work paid off. people came from all over america. some americans living abroad flew home to participate in the march. people came from almost every state, people from idaho, wyoming, montana, church groups, labor groups, student groups, just plain, everyday individuals. >> rose: and what did your heart say to you when you heard martin luther king say, "i have a dream?" >> when martin luther king jr. got to that place in that spe
king delivered his "i have a dream" speech. john f. kennedy had come into office. helping to spur him and the nation to further action, civil rights leaders organized a march to intergrate equality in the south. they're called the freedom fighters. >> reporter: for too long in america segregation in the south was synonymous. but in the 1960s a new generation armed with a new supreme court decision prohibiting discrimination challenged the status quo in the south. >> this land is composed of two different cultures. a white culture and a colored culture and i've lived close to them all my life. but i'm told that we mistreated them and that we must change and these changes are coming faster than i expected. >> reporter: in the 50s, change wasn't just coming it had arrived. blacks were risking their homes, their jobs even their lives for freedom and equality for a taste of america's democracy. >> i was hit in the head with a wooden crate. knocked down, bloodied and i was going in and out of consciousness. i thought i was going to die. >> reporter: georgia congressman john lewis was a youn
but it happen before the kennedy assassination. but then for the rest of the reid to be thrown into the jfk circuit garrison is better known as kevin costner these-- the new orleans district attorney investigating the kennedy assassination in the '60s. [laughter] tried to get him involved in the investigation and after harrison started to suggest he was a part of the plot. garrison put out a press release saying he was closely associated withheld lee oswald that a number of locations in new orleans is in 1963. he gave a deposition before a grand jury at the beginning of 68 and the experience convinced them that his team was not interested in justice they seem content to pigeonhole him as a conservative. i explained several times i am not a traditionalist and/or a nationalist erases but i opposed the john birch society that what passes today for conservatism. i a right wing for individualism but it is not authoritarianism they looked at me blankly not seeming to hear. garrisons allegations spread to the underground press and he put out his story available in every venue available. ocean livi
. i am here with kennedy, the special correspondent on business network stossel and " -- the kennedy cover. in bookstores now. and filling in for andy levy is bjorn. he is clean shaven except for a portion of his back that spells out abba. >> backwards. >> and my repulsive sidekick, bill schulz. >> sitting next to me, the great actor and singer and at wearer wearer -- and hat wearer, robert dovi. >> i want to know if she did the miley cyrus tongue thing a block. the lede. that's the first story. greg, what is the opposite of hooray? booo. >> he is getting bitter. they want to tax bats. they want to tax baseball and other discriminatory groups. the group named the boy scouts, the future farmer of america has examples of groups that could lose their tax relief if found to discriminate against stuff like sexual orientation and nationality and freckles. supporters of the bill says groups should not get preferable treatment from the irs if they discriminate. it forces organizations with faith-based beliefs to adopt the government's outlook on sexual orientation and gender identity. meanwh
. tell us the environment that this march happened in. >> well, you know, you sound like john kennedy. he was assured there was going to be violence. he was sure we'd have turmoil and turbulence of all kind at the march. but we had faith. god had brought us along, dr. king kept us under the commitment to let justice roll down but not let violence roll down in our experience. so we trusted god. and we prayed. when i got to washington, i came in early that morning from chicago, and there was nobody around. i came on a plane and i got nervous that we made a mistake. but then late morning, the place filled up. and we had been having martin tell us everybody who came this would be a non-violent experiment. a non-violent experience. and surely enough there wasn't a single arrest that i recall made. there was no violence. people were joyful. people were warm and loving. and people were serious. people came -- we didn't -- excuse me. we didn't come to play. we came to change history. really didn't know we'd change as much as we did, but we knew america would never be the same after those 250,000
and speeches, and in an address. no matter, one writes you're a clever one. i know john kennedy would never be on your page, even then i'm sure he hated everything you stood for. i was a little tike at the time. jt, i believe john kennedy was for tax cuts, but you're still stupid, you're still ugly, and you still have a big head. all right. understood. taxes were higher when kennedy was president. he could afford to lower them. keep the focus on his remarks, taxpayers know more to do with their money than the government knows to do with their money, any economy, any time. and liberals couldn't be more clueless. cal e-mails why do i picture neil cavuto watching jfk and cheering like that e-trade kid, bottle in one hand, sausage hero in the other, shouting at the top of his lungs, jfk! jfk! cal, how did you know. alexandra writes how could anyone hearing john kennedy's own words think you doctored the tapes? what did those critics expect, that in the next segment he would say don't believe a word i just said? >> and another thing about obama kennedy, you would never hear obama utter the most
of -- of the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons. >> president barack obama appointed caroline kennedy to be the next ambassador to japan. as the daughter of the late president john f. kennedy, she's widely known. like roos, she will start her post with no previous diplomatic experience. like him, she will have to learn on the job. observers will be watching to see whether kennedy can build on what roos achieved. to make japan/u.s. relations even stronger. nhk world, tokyo. >>> firefighters in the western u.s. state of california are still struggling. they're trying to contain a wildfire that began near yosemite national park. state authorities are mobilizing more firefighters and are calling on residents and tourists to remain cautious. the fire consumed more than 54,000 hectares of forest land, more than a week after it broke out. two firefighters were injured battling the blaze. officials say the fire is spreading rapidly because the air is dry and the trees are close together. many residents were forced to evacuate as about 4,500 houses and buildings are possibly in the fire's path
that along. >> yet the kennedy administration was nervous enough about potential for violence in a march of this type and the president attorney general were like, i don't know if this is a good idea. in fact, he had some of the leaders into the white house. >> he did and think of it, they had the march on a wednesday. the liquor all stores in d.c. they had army reserves on notice to come into the city if things turned violent. and kennedy didn't know what to it, let's face it. he was worried that all these people are coming to washington, is an unheard of kind of phenomenon in those days so he wanted to be hands-on. so it was interesting, after the march, he had the leaders come back to the white house and congratulated them on the great success. >> president kennedy invited us down to the white house. he stood in the oval office and us, shook each one of our hands. proud like a beaming father. you could see it all over him. was so happy and so pleased that everything had gone so well. gwen: in your piece for the smithsonian, you talked to a lot were there that day and some who spoke. h
or pear shaped in the 60s. when bobby kennedy went to hoover said, you have to get serious. now, at this point, hoover didn't accept there was the mafia. he was ordered by the attorney regime, you have to develop a strategy. they went after the mafia. it really didn't pick up until the 70ings. that's a national policy. the problem with national policies is they don't have regional differences, and in boston, the model did not fit. you had agents told, do who yo have to do to make the policy work. in the 1960s, what they did is they played god. they decided who to be killed. there was an irish gang lord in the 60s, and more than 60 men were killed, and whitey was lucky because he was locked up at the time. statisticically, that was a high chance he would have been a perpetrator or victim of the violence. instead, he comes out to a decimated landscape, it's wide open for anyone with opportunity and smart and viciousness, and he had all those things, and he goes there, and they are cynical. he is saying, and the other thing about the fbi, you get promotions. you get salaries based
. king from the white house, from -- learned from john f. kennedy according to john lewis and others who were there about worrying about the -- the violence that was supposed to come from the very people who had been the victims of violence during the movement. >> well, that was not a casual thought. the their are forces within the united states government -- there are forces within the united states government, particularly j. edgar hoover coming out of the justice depend that had moved agents it deliver all sorts of justifications for why he was right in thinking that that would become not a demonstration of the best in america but become a blood bath in a racial conflict. i mean, that was constantly being put before not only john kennedy but bobby kennedy, as well. and this -- this authoritative voice coming from our system, our justice system, j. edgar hoover, carried a great weight. and the president felt he had great reasons to be concerned. there were a large contingent of national guards and forces on the ready in the periphery waiting to move at any moment of provocation. much t
after kennedy was killed. and i realized what was going on in the country. and as a soldier, i couldn't participate in this. i could just watch it. and as i watched it unfold, i said, you know, this is a time for america to live up to its creed, and this is the time for us to understand that segregation and jim crowe-ism, and awful laws are not just a burden for african americans. they are a burden for all americans, americans carrying this awful weight on their shoulder which we at one time hoped would be relieved by the civil war. but the civil war didn't do it, not withstanding president lincoln's desires before he was assassinated when he talked about the rebirth of the nation, the nation of the people, for the people, by the people, but he meant all the people. but it didn't happen. and jim crowe and segregation came in. so we needed a new effort, a new civil war. and the leader of that war was martin luther king jr. >> schieffer: i was very interested to read in "time" nation their special issue devoted to this anniversary, you said the "i have a dream" speech held up a mirror f
died in the struggle. we had met with president kennedy six of us, the big six. >> who were the big six. randolph he was the dean of the group. and the leader of the man, the man. he was so gifted. so smart, labor leader. spokesperson for civil rights had all the nice brotherhood. born in jacksonville, florida, moved to new york. and then you had whitney young of the national urban league. who was born in kentucky and later became a social worker and handled the school at atlanta university and a beautiful human being. and james farmer, who had attended college in texas and howard university. worked with the n.a.a.c.p. and later became the head of corps the congress racial equality. and roy wilkins head of the n.a.a.c.p. grew up in minnesota. he was a warrior he was a fighter. and then young martin luther king, jr.. born in georgia, man that i admired, i loved. he was my inspiration. >> and then you? myself. the youngster. i was young. i was really young. so i grewvc:÷ up very poor in rl alabama and growing up, i saw the signs that said white men, colored men, white women, colored wome
talking a need for tax cu cuts. now ironically kennedy won out,ly did not live to see it. his successor lyndon johnson did, enjoying the boone that jfk predicted. to investor, wilbur ross said that remember the other significant story sandwiched in between. people forget it. >> they do. i can't imagine why, but they do. neil: you know, amazi is that kennedy had a fight on his hand with liberals in his party. buhe was in the pro serves cobbling together enough support that was realized by a successor. but it was an uphill fight. >> in those days there were me moderates in the congress. now there is an extreme polarization, that makes it more difficult to det compromise through. neil: i was looking at deficit, 12 billion-dollars. but, the idea that you could grow your way out of this, rather than just cut our way out. today, we have both grow and cut. what do we do? >> i do think that tax moderation would be a good part of the solution, it is significant to note that european union, not a very right wing group, has told france, they can't raise more taxes they want them actual to make spe
. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-violence. people came that day to their march dressed like they were on their way to a religious service. as hayley jackson was saying how we got over. how we got over drew thousands of us together in a strange sense. it seemed like the whole place started rocking. we truly believe that in
with president kennedy. in 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, and count the number of jelly baean in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested in the south for trying to participate in the democratic process. medgar evers had been killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believed in a way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people came that day to that march just like they were on their way to a religious service. as mahalie jackson sang "how we got over," she drew thousands of us together in a strange sense. it seemed like the whole place started rocking. we truly believed that in every human being, even
led by a. phillip randolph wanted to march on washington, president kennedy was weary and urged them to call it off. the group of six believed the march on washington would provide the best chance for a safe rights bill. >> we hope that by going to washington by the thousands, sitting in the halls of congress, if necessary, and in the offices of recalcitrant congressmen, we will be able to arouse a conscience of the senate so the coalition of southern and right wing northern republicans will not prove to be the legislative incinerator that will again burn to ashes any possible civil rights bill. >> what do you think the effect of the august 28 march will be, both on country and the congress? >> i think the purpose of course is to attempt to bring to the attention of the congress and the country the strong feeling of a good many thousands of citiz citizens. i don't know of course -- i don't know how many are going to come. >> in the end, the organizers expected 100,000, but more than 200,000 came that day. the city was jittery. 4,000 federal troops waited poised for violence. the city
is the associate professor of public policy at the harvard kennedy school of government. professor, sec tate, john kerry, said that there's very little doubt that the syrian government had gassed it's own citizens, and if that's the case, what are we going to see from the west? >> well, that's certainly hard to know. certainly making that determination that the syrian government used chemical weapons makes an armed intervention more likely. but i should note that the u.n. team that's going to inspect the site of the attack is not empowered or mandated to determine who carried out the attack. so the syrian government and it's allies will likely continue to claim that the attack was carried out by rebels. so there's not going to be the crystal clarity that secretary kerry hopes for. >> you mentioned, professor, that the scope is not affected. but on a broader note, given the violence that's rocking the countries, do a you feel that the u.s. influence is declining now in the middle east? >> well, that's a really tough question. to go back to your first question, is u.s. intervention likely? it causes
who was represented by daughter lynda. president kennedy by daughter caroline. >> 50 years ago my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted america to our highest ideals. >> reporter: on that day, reverend king and others met with kennedy at the white house. >> the president made it very clear that we would need very strong bipartisan support if we were to get a civil rights legislation this year. >> reporter: today the president stood where king stood. >> we might not face the same dangers at 1963, the urgency of now remains. no one can match king's brilliance, but the same flame that lit the heart of all who were willing to take the first step for justice, i know that flame remains. >> we'll be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual, free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> reporter: king would never guess 50 years later his bust would proudly be displayed in the oval office, but it's there along with a framed copy of the original program of the march on washington. a reminder it
't. >> neil: ladies, thank you very much. john kennedy says what? tax cuts? a lot of you think i edited that jfk interview in which he calls for tax cuts. you're right, did edit it. you should hear what i left out. and you know what next? you will. . [ male announcer ] come to the golden opportunity sales event to experience the precision handling of the lexus performance vehicles, including the gs and all-new is. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ >> neil: jf what did he say? more than a few of you absolutely stunned to hear john f. kennedy talking about tax cuts half a c
not nurture racial sentiment. just as i believe given the fact that kennedy, who had opposed the march when he received the six leaders afterwards did so with great joy and embraced them. it seems to me that that speech, that march changed the president of the united states and a year later, we had the 1964 civil rights act. >> with that said, michael bes loss, we know initially a few months prior, president kennedy had met with the civil rights leaders and expressed his worry about this gathering of mostly african-americans. we know there were people from all over the corrupt, both black and white but it was mostly african-american and there was a worry from the president. >> yeah, he felt that this was something that he always feared an event like this that was spontaneous and could not be controlled. there was a heavy national guard presence waiting. it was talking earlier in the afternoon, kennedy administration had a guy under that platform so that if anyone like john lewis sounded too radical, they were going to turn the volume on the recording of mahalia jackson singing "he's got the wh
, bobby kennedy, the attorney general had personally authorized two j. edgar hoover fbi requests for unlimited bugging and wiretapping of dr. king. eight wiretaps, 16 bugs, his phones, hotel rooms, bedrooms, and they used the sound that they collected, they used the information they collected in those wiretaps to try to destroy dr. king both professionally and personally. he was awarded the nobel peace prize, j. edgar hoover personally convened a press conference in his office in which he personally called martin luther king a notorious liar. hoover's intelligence chief put together a series of tapes that he said were recorded in dr. king's bedrooms and hotel rooms, the fbi intelligence chief wrote a letter that he put together with those tapes and he sent it in a package to dr. king's home. king, look into your heart, there's only one way out for you. you better take it before your filthy abnormal fraudulent self is beared to the nation. that's what the fbi sent to king's house with a package of tapes they said were made from the bugs they put in his bedrooms, a letter threateni
no, the men are going to do this, and after the march, president kennedy invited the organizers to come to the white house. if you looked at the pictures today on t.v. of all the men with kennedy, they told the women you can't come, go back to your hotels, and that included coretta scott king, king's wife. >> you feel she was marginalized in the years after the march? >> in the years after the march, after he was assassinated, the male movement leaders at that time came to her and they said we know you're planning on opening the martin luther king center in atlanta, which exists today as the most complete archive of the civil rights movement. we know you're going to open this, but you really need to step aside and they use those words, step aside and let us run it. of course she refused. she said no, i am coretta scott king, i am not going to step aside, but they certainly did pressure her to do that. >> lin, you are not on the aim page. >> there is no mention of her on the king memorial to this day, and martin luther king said hands, the statute do not show his wedding ring, wh
, the chairman of the john f. kennedy center for the performing arts; david rubenstein. [audience applause]. ♪ ♪ david rubenstein: the last time i danced in public it was at my bar mitzvah. it wasn't a pretty site then either. tonight you have seen why ellen degeneres is such a worthy recipient of the 15th mark twain prize. like mark twain, and each of the previous 14 recipients of the prize, tonight's award winner has a unique style and manner of making people laugh. in ellen's case it is to use warmth and wit, grace and charm, friendliness and happiness. and all of this is always with a smile on her face and a spark in her step; especially her dance step. it is unlikely that others can replicate this unique approach to humor, but no doubt others will try. they will try because ellen has simply become one of the modern "gold standards" of humor. and for that reason, at some point down the road, we can expect to see other organizations giving out humor awards, and calling them the, "ellen degeneres awards." but tonight, we are pleased that ellen is the recipient of our award and i am n
six, the civil rights organization, met with john f kennedy just days before i had been elected the national chair. in a meeting with president kennedy, my first official act. at this meeting, randolph, a-- a philip randolph, the founder of the brotherhood ,spokesperson, told president kennedy we were going to march on washington. president kennedy was concerned. he started twisting and turning in his chair. he asked us whether he thought there would be violence. mr. randolph said, mr. president, this will be a peaceful, nonviolent protest. he was not so sure. 6000 police officers and troops were deployed around the city. liquor stands were abandoned. a major league baseball game was someone even rigged our file system so they could pull the plug if necessary. the spirit had engulfed people. people came like they were on their way to a religious service. they were going to a meeting. mahalia jackson saying, how we got over? thousands of us together, it seemed like the whole place, the whole mall, started rocking. somehow in some way, peace, love, and nonviolence had been instill
, barack obama is not the new dr. king. he's the new john kennedy. he is the new lyndon johnson, which is why it's so egregious that they try to take away from the legitimacy of his presidency because drrks king and others thought he could be possible but not as him. people in civil rights are behaving as they are behaving. he is in another realm and he is even being profiled in that realm which is why we have to continue to fight. >> i know a lot of as you point out want to make these parallels to mlk and the president. this is the president of the united states, though. while he does personify, really embody the dream it goes well beyond what mlk tried to lay out 50 years ago in that "i have a dream" speech. what do you think the president wants to do today? because, obviously, he feels the onus, the weight of what it means to be in the position that he is in, to stand in the shadows there of the lincoln memorial and in the shadows of mlk, and really speak to this nation, to try to talk about the racial divide that still exists, but not to discount how far we have come. >> well, he m
with john f kennedy just days before i had been elected the national chair. in a meeting with president kennedy, my first official act. at this meeting, randolph, a spokesperson, told president kennedy we were going to march on washington. president kennedy was concerned. he started twisting and turning in his chair. he asked us whether he thought there would be violence. mr. randolph said, mr. president, this will be a peaceful, nonviolent protest. he was not so sure. 6000 police officers and troops were deployed around the city. liquor stands were abandoned. a major league baseball game was canceled. someone even rate a sister, so our file system, so they could pull the plug if necessary. the only way to religious service. they were going to a meeting. saying, how we got over? thousands of us together, it seemed like the whole place, the whole mall, started rocking. somehow in some way, peace, love, and nonviolence had been instilled in the very being of all the participants. we believed in every human being, even those violent toward us, there was the spark of the divine. we had a ri
committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963 -- we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test. count the number of jelly beans in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the south in trying to participate in the democratic process. that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington. to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. residents were told to stay home that day. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect. because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people came that day to that march dressed like they were on their way to a religious service. how we got over, how we got over. thousands together. in a strange sense, it seemed like the whole place stop rocking. we truly believe that in every human being, even those who were violent toward us, there was a spark of th
'm tired of the fat jokes who knew that jack kennedy got it long before ronald reagan did, the words coming back to haunt a lot of liberals, they think that i doctored to make jfk saying and he did not then to sell tax cuts, bowl s would o that? p. purchase eraser? it's the easy way to erase any recent travel expense. i just pick a charge, like my flight with a few taps, it's taken care of. impressive baldwin. does it work for hotels? absolutely thank goodness. mrs. villain and i are planning our... you scare me. and i like it. let's go what's in your wallet? >> i'm in favor of a tax cut i'm concerned if we don't get the tax cut we'll have an increase of unemployment and move into a period of economic downturn. neil: liberals who hate tax cuts better rethink that one, when it comes to basic economics they don't know, jack literally, i show john kennedy in his own words, some not only refuse to believe it, they thought that i edited the tape, carroll in new york city, whites you doctored that kennedy click, if he was for tax cuts then i am michelle obama. katie, said there is no way that he
knew that jack kennedy got it long before ronald reagan did, the words coming back to haunt a lot of liberals, they think that i doctored to make jfk saying and he did not then to sell tax cuts, bowl ♪ nascar is about excitement. but tracking all the action and hearing everything from our marketing partners, the media and millions of fans on social media can be a challenge. that's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >> i'm in favor of a tax cut i'm concerned if we don't get the tax cut we'll have an increase of unemployment and move into a period of economic downturn. neil: liberals who hate tax cuts better rethink that one, when it comes to basic economics they don't know, jack literally, i show john kennedy in his own words, some not only refuse to believe it, they thoughthat i edited the tape, carroll in new york city, whites you doctored that kennedy click, if he was for tax cuts then i am miche
they wanted. kennedy had announced his intentions. his support for such an act. what was the dynamics here politically of showing up with 200,000 people on the mall? >> he was, woulding his way, you get the tapes. you can get some tapes. kennedy was working with his through the judiciary committee in the house. he was working him to get some of the liberal members who are being a little too perfecto. they wouldn't push the liberal health care, the civil rights bill. this is public accommodations and fair employment practices. you can go to the restrooms, hotels, restaurants. these are the doors closed for african-americ african-americans. and he was pushing that through right up until he died. now, you can wonder whether he had ever gotten past comber and those guys, but he was doing what he could do. and the shock of his assassination. and the legislative genius of the president. and, of course, the outside as you've said so many times, the partnership between outside and inside all came together and magically, they got a bill through, and the supreme court said yeah, that's the other thi
himself about giving a speech. president john f. kennedy. taylor branch who was with us earlier writes president kennedy watched king's speech on tv. he was impressed with how effortlessly he broke into his "i have a dream" refrain. branch says kennedy turned to his aides and remarked he's damn good. certainly was. we'll be right back. nascar is ab.out excitement but tracking all the action and hearing everything from our marketing partners, the media and millions of fans on social media can be a challenge. that's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. to fly home for the big family reunion. you must be garth's father? hello. mother. mother! traveling is easy with the venture card because you can fly any airline anytime. two words. double miles! this guy can act. wanna play dodge rock? oh, you guys! and with double miles you can actually use, you never miss the fun. beard growing contest and go! ♪ i win! wh
a thing or two himself about giving a speech. president john f. kennedy. taylor branch who was with us earlier writes president kennedy watched king's speech on tv. he was impressed with how effortlessly he broke into his "i have a dream" refrain. branch says kennedy turned to his aides and remarked he's damn good. certainly was. we'll be right back. ♪ i got a hammer ♪ and i got a bell ♪ i got a song to sing all over this land ♪ ♪ ♪ >> that rhythm, it was rousing back then. we're back right now, it was the great folk group, peter paul and marry, "if i had a hammer" performing 50 years ago today. he performed today five decades after the famous march. he's not the musician, he's the activist. the very issues of war, and civil rights that they fought for back then. thank you for joining us. thank you very much. let me ask you about the fact that, one of the great reactions that dr. king got 50 years ago, he said, we have a lot of whites here. by the fact that we're here, and the crowd went up. >> what that was then was an affair of the heart. it was not an affair of policy, p
president kennedy chose not to address the crowd on that august day but now five decades later we will watch as president obama, nation's first black president reflects on the legacy of dr. king and what the march has meant for the progress of our nation. with me now, two men who eloquently lent their voices to yesterday's celebration. president of the naacp. and lee saunders head of the acme labor union. thank you for joining me. >> thank you. >> one of the things we are already hearing, it is always the expectations and expectations for the president are pretty high going into wednesday. how will he meet those expectations? or can he? >> there is really no way to. i think that he should get a boy scout badge or something for even being willing to step out there. it would have been easier and many would suggest just doing it from the oval office. just avoid that place on that day. now that he is doing it, it is clear this is more after reflection, a recreation, and that's much of what we should hope for, is for the president to put in place where we are and what we need to move ahead. one t
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